Triumph Daytona 675 – the perfect track bike?

daytona-rearWhen Triumph released the Daytona 675 in 2006 to the public it took the world by storm. Here was a small British manufacturer taking on the Japanese in one of the most fiercely contested market segments; the midweight 600 class and smashing the competition into oblivion. This really was Triumph’s finest hour, demonstrating a practical application of Britain’s first class engineering heritage to the world.

Just as Supermarine combined a phenomenal engine package in the Merlin engine with a ground breaking airframe to produce the superlative Spitfire before World War II, Triumph achieved their own victory by designing a phenomenal 675 triple engine married to a staggeringly composed and responsive chassis.

d675The Daytona 675 exceeds the sum of its parts however because it has another quality that is often lacking in Japanese motorcycles. That quality is character. It’s not easy to define, but you’ll recognise it as soon as you ride a Daytona 675. You’ll appreciate the phenomenal torque delivered by its three cylinder engine across the rev range, the howl from the exhaust as you surge towards the redline, and the complete composure of its chassis regardless of road or track conditions. Nothing, in the midweight class, could compete with the package offered by Triumph in the Daytona 675 and it went on to win both Supertest and Masterbike’s prestigious awards in the Supersport class two years in a row (in 2006 and 2007).

The Daytona 675 went through two signficant iterations in 2009 and then 2011 before being completely revamped in 2013.

2006- First incarnation
2009- Headlamp/fairing redesign, less weight, +3bhp, new top end, lighter wheels, improved suspension and brakes
2011- Introduction of the 675R. Ohlins suspension and Brembo brakes
2013- Complete re-design

1GG_0863Track and road riding are two different disciplines. Riders that are new to the track benefit from smaller capacity bikes that don’t overwhelm their abilities. Many experts suggest that a 400cc four, or 600cc twin is the perfect bikes on which to learn track craft. These types of bike force you to focus on corner speed and the maintenance of momentum; all of which contribute to increased confidence, ability and ultimately faster lap times.

Once you start to acquire those track skills, you will want a more powerful machine. This is where any Supersport category motorcycle will meet that need. In the hands of an accomplished rider a 600cc machine will anihilate a less capable rider on a bigger machine despite giving away 40-80 horsepower.

The key attributes of a track motorcycle are:

– designed for track use
– relatively low cost (both to buy and maintain)
– easy to upgrade
– cheap to repair with wide availability of new and used spares

So are all 600cc motorcycles from 2000-2010 the same? In short “no”. In order to win races, Japanese motorcycles have chased more horsepower with ever increasing red lines and narrower power bands as a by product. If you exit a corner in the wrong gear on a Japanese Supersport bike, you will be eaten alive the bikes following behind.

RYE_6275Triumph’s 675 triple engine nearly matches the Japanese in headline horsepower but it delivers usuable power right across the rev range. Invariably this means nearly double the available torque at 5000RPM. This is what gives the Daytona 675 so much usuable drive out of corners and is what makes the bike so forgiving to less experienced riders.

To be honest a 750cc motorcycle is probably the capacity bike for track use because it affords a combination of 600cc handling combined with 1000cc like engine performance. Of all the Supersport bikes from the noughties (2000-2009), the Daytona 675 is probably the closest match to a 750 – a fact borne out in many head to head comparisons with Suzuki’s GSXR750 where the Daytona 675 regularly turns in faster lap times.

Are you sold on the Daytona 675? If so, which model should you buy?

My advice would be to go for the 2009-2012 models. If you can find an “R” model, so much the better. The newer 2013+ models are both more expensive, less easily tuned and will have less second hand part availability. It’s worth noting that there is almost complete parts interchangeability between the 2006-8 and 2009-12 models which gives access to a huge set of available parts and spares.

My own track bike is a 2009 Daytona 675 on which I have done nearly 3000 track miles! Over the past two years I have made the following changes to the bike (incrementally):

520 chain conversion: -1/+2 gearing change for better drive
suspension: new K-Tech springs and valves (front) and K-Tech 35DDS lite rear shock
slipper clutch: swapped for a 2013 slipper clutch

Apart from using increasingly stickier track tyres each season, I don’t have any further immediate upgrade plans, although a removal of the catalytic converter and a remap on a dyno are on the cards.

I sometimes wonder about changing my Daytona for something else… but then I realise that this bike does everything that I ask of it so well that I’m pretty sure I would only be disappointed by something else. Plus I’m not sure I’m ready to give up on the howl and crackle emerging from its Arrow exhaust as I drive from corner to corner!

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4 thoughts on “Triumph Daytona 675 – the perfect track bike?”

  1. Hi. Been reading your 675 articles with interest (thank you!) as I’m looking at setting up a track bike ready for next year. You suggest going for a 675R if I can find one. I reckon a 2011 675R is about £6700 today (18 Nov 2016) whereas a 2011 675 is about £5000. I’ve totted up the changes you’ve made to your own bike (roughly front forks £600, rear shock £900, slipper clutch £500, quickshifter £300) which would roughly mean a standard 675 costing £7300 overall or £600 more than the 675R. As all of the above comes as standard on a 675R would you still suggest the R is the right choice or do you think there are untold benefits to building your own, e.g getting to know your own bike a bit more from the inside out? Just interested to gauge your thoughts. Cheers

    1. I would definitely get the 675R if you can as it also has Brembo brakes fitted as standard. It will save you a lot of time and effort sourcing all the extra parts to fit to a 2009+ non R model. Personally I have enjoyed upgrading my bike over the past three years, and the benefit of doing so has been to show me how much better the more expensive parts have improved the bike. Being able to fit a new part and comparing it to the bike in its previous state has helped me to learn a lot too.

      Good luck finding a 675 – you won’t be disappointed in your choice of track bike. I’m certain of it!

      1. Many thanks. I think I tend to agree – I have limited time to actually work on a bike so an R would be a solid head start. Just found a 2011 with 10k miles for £6k – now where can I put it?! ;)

  2. bueno a decir verdad he tenido la triumph 2008 la 2012 R y ahora tengo la 2014R y digo que no me arrepiento de esta moto ,tiene una baja media increible y en alta es bien rapida ,lo que no entiendo porque la 3014 no la hicieron de relacion igual a la 2012
    La 2012= 16/47
    La 2014= 15/47

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